Clausewitz: The Trinity of War

Carl von Clausewitz is regarded as one of the foremost philosophers of war to have ever lived.  A Prussian army officer and veteran of the Napoleonic Wars—including Prussia’s darkest hours during the 1806 Campaign, he lived through exciting military and intellectual times.  He lived through the Prussian army reforms after their disastrous defeats at the … Continue reading Clausewitz: The Trinity of War

Kant: On Perpetual Peace

Among Immanuel Kant’s famous essays is his essay “To Eternal Peace” (alternatively titled “On Perpetual Peace”).  In this essay, published in 1795 right at the onset of the French Revolutionary Wars, Kant follows up on his philosophy of history by offering deep contemplation on the nature of unfolding history and constitutions to peace among nations.  … Continue reading Kant: On Perpetual Peace

Existentialism, War, and Fascism

I have explored the actual intellectual currents and heritage of fascism in a series of posts here.  The fact is, most of the people whom are called “fascist” are not fascist.  The degradation of language is pernicious and indicative of the moral degeneracy of our current culture - though this is not a new phenomenon … Continue reading Existentialism, War, and Fascism

Kant: Idea of Universal History with Cosmopolitan Intent

Immanuel Kant wrote a number of important books, but he was also an important essayist—and some of his most important philosophical reflections, with longstanding and consequential legacies, were written as essays.  One of his most famous essays, with a rich consequential legacy, was “Idea of Universal History with Cosmopolitan Intent.”  One of the first elaborations … Continue reading Kant: Idea of Universal History with Cosmopolitan Intent

Carl Schmitt: On Human Nature

“[F]or it is a fact that the entire life of a human being is a struggle and every human being symbolically a combatant. The friend, enemy, and combat concepts receive their real meaning precisely because they refer to the real possibility of physical killing. War follows from enmity. War is the existential negation of the … Continue reading Carl Schmitt: On Human Nature