St. Augustine’s Theology of Love and Justice

Justice is an integral theme in Augustine’s political theology, and justice is directly correlated and contingent upon his theology of love.  True justice, for Augustine, begins with the love of God (and thereby extending to love of others since the love of others is the ultimate expression of love of God; the two commandments that … Continue reading St. Augustine’s Theology of Love and Justice

Reading Augustine’s City of God: The Two Cities

Augustine’s City of God is one of the great works of Western literature: philosophy, cultural criticism, theology, and development of Christian doctrines.  At 22 books, and over 1,000 pages (most translations), the City of God is not light reading but is generally considered one of the most masterful works ever produced in the Western philosophical … Continue reading Reading Augustine’s City of God: The Two Cities

Cicero: On Duties and Obligations

Cicero, perhaps the most famous of the Roman philosophers, wrote an influential treatise on duties and obligations published after his death.  De Officiis, along with his Republic/Commonwealth and Laws, is Cicero’s longstanding legacy to the West.  In fact, On Obligations was widely influential in that it influenced Sts. Augustine and Thomas Aquinas, becoming an integral … Continue reading Cicero: On Duties and Obligations

Reading Augustine’s City of God: Book I

Augustine’s City of God stands as one of the masterpieces of Late Latin literature, and one of the classics of Christian literature.  The book itself is many things, and is sometimes derided for its systematically unsystematic nature – that is, Augustine is talking about too many things in the book all at once which makes … Continue reading Reading Augustine’s City of God: Book I

Cicero: The Laws, Book I

Having examined Cicero’s Republic (or On the Commonwealth), we turn to his sequel which has been widely influential in the development of natural law theory, humanism, and enshrined Cicero as one of the “righteous pagans” in Catholic history, The Laws. The Laws, though independent of the Republic, was meant to be read as a compendium … Continue reading Cicero: The Laws, Book I

Cicero: On Education and Humanism

Besides political commentary, although Cicero’s ruminations about education and philosophy are still tied to his political philosophy, Cicero’s other great undercurrent of thought in the Republic is the relationship between philosophy and education with the health of one’s soul and how this pursuit of wisdom impacts how one acts and engages in the world.  Naturally … Continue reading Cicero: On Education and Humanism

Cicero: The Three Forms of Government and Constitutional Revolutions

Cicero’s political philosophy is the most comprehensive from among the Roman philosophers.  In fact, we owe much to Cicero, since he was the one who translated politeia as “republic” with regard to Plato, hence forever passing on Plato’s great work to us as The Republic.  He paid homage to Plato by the name.  We examined … Continue reading Cicero: The Three Forms of Government and Constitutional Revolutions