Karl Marx: On the Jewish Question

Karl Marx’s essay “On the Jewish Question,” at the face of it, seems like a typical anti-Semitic piece of writing where Marx decried the god of the Jews as the idol of mammon.  However, the essay is of political importance as it details several noticeable things about Marx’s political thought.  First is his assertion that … Continue reading Karl Marx: On the Jewish Question

Dante’s Inferno, III: Hell as an Allegorical Contrast to Catholic Teaching

In our exploration of Dante’s Inferno, I have already explored the general construction of Hell in its two tiers in the first part of this essay series, and I then explored the relationship between Dante and Virgil in the second part of this series.  This final part will highlight in some greater detail what has … Continue reading Dante’s Inferno, III: Hell as an Allegorical Contrast to Catholic Teaching

Hegel on History, IV: The Age of Freedom and End of History

We last left off with Hegel’s philosophy of history with the failure of the Aristocratic Age to produce universal freedom.  If we recall, the Aristocratic Age, that age of great movement, creativity, and the arts, and the dialectic between the aristocrats and plebeians, failed because there was no notion that all men were equal.  This … Continue reading Hegel on History, IV: The Age of Freedom and End of History

The Specters of Fascism, Part VII

In concluding our series in examining fascism, its roots, its concrete manifestations, and its legacies, we have noted what is fascism and what is not fascism.  The common threads of fascist thought include: the synthesis of the people with the state for militaristic and warring ends (since conflict defines life through and through), that fascism’s … Continue reading The Specters of Fascism, Part VII

Carl Schmitt: The Friend-Enemy Distinction

In one of his early and most well-known works, the Concept of the Political, Carl Schmitt endeavors to explore what the political is and is not.  There are multiple layers to Schmitt’s thinking and his criticism of liberalism, in particular, and where he sees himself in the grand scheme of Hegelian epochal historicism and the … Continue reading Carl Schmitt: The Friend-Enemy Distinction

Paganism and the Alt-Right

For people who are a bit more familiar with the phenomenon of the “Alt-Right” than the media, one notices in their publications, books, and public gatherings a seemingly odd interest in “Paganism.”  Alt-Right leaders and faces often consider themselves to be pagan, call for a “re-paganization” of Europe – or if in America claim some … Continue reading Paganism and the Alt-Right

Agamben and Schmitt: On The Problem of Sovereignty

The question of sovereignty is a hotly debated and studied one in political philosophy.  Sovereignty, traditionally, means the right to decide to kill; or, more benignly, the right to exercise control over mortality – the right to “decide on the exception.”  This is the universal definition of sovereignty and therefore sovereignty does not equate to … Continue reading Agamben and Schmitt: On The Problem of Sovereignty