What is Platonic Irony?

What is Platonic irony?  When reading Plato’s dialogues philosophers are often keen to highlight irony within his texts.  Irony, however, is not necessarily what we think of it today.  Rather, Platonic irony is carefully constructed and inserted into the text by Plato himself.  Platonic irony is deeply dialectical in the Socratic sense, since Plato’s literary … Continue reading What is Platonic Irony?

Misunderstanding Plato

Plato is, arguably, the most important philosopher in the Western tradition.  This is not because everyone is a Platonist, or has been a Platonist.  Though many have.  This is because Plato started, at least in codification through writing, the discipline we remember – and still practice today – as philosophy.  But Plato is a deep … Continue reading Misunderstanding Plato

The Real Meaning of Plato’s Crito

The Crito is probably the most famous Platonic dialogue after Republic, or it certainly is one of the more memorable dialogues and rivals Phaedo, Symposium, and Laws as the most famous dialogue after the Republic.  Part of the charm of Crito is its relatively short length and seemingly straightforward dialogue.  But what is the true … Continue reading The Real Meaning of Plato’s Crito

Plato’s Phaedo

Phaedo is one of the more famous of the Platonic dialogues not named Republic.  The dialogue concerns itself with the nature of the human soul and the afterlife, but also implies the contention of “world flight” within non-Christianized Platonic philosophy (e.g. the view that Plato’s philosophy ultimately regards the material world as a hindrance that … Continue reading Plato’s Phaedo

Plato’s Euthyphro

Plato’s Euthyphro is one of the more famous of the shorter dialogues.  Several of the major themes are brought up in the dialogue include theology, ethics, and filialism.  As such, we will briefly examine the major themes and their impact on philosophy. The beginning of the dialogue is Socrates seeking an answer to the question … Continue reading Plato’s Euthyphro

Plato: The Laws, Book I

Plato’s dialogue The Laws is his largest and most significant work.  It is not merely a work of political philosophy but it is also work of philosophy proper.  In this, Plato asserts that philosophy encompasses all things.  Philosophy concerns itself with the nature of justice, political regimes, knowledge, the soul, human passions and emotions, aesthetics, … Continue reading Plato: The Laws, Book I