Dante’s Inferno, I: The Construction of Hell

Dante’s three part epic poem the Divine Comedy, or Commedia, is one of the most influential and dense works of poetic literature in the Western tradition.  Building off of Homer and Virgil, and influencing the likes of Chaucer, Milton, Blake, and Tennyson, as well as bringing to popular consciousness and form the modern Italian language, … Continue reading Dante’s Inferno, I: The Construction of Hell

The Great Divide: Political Philosophy, Ancient vs. Modern

The history of political philosophy is often divided between the classics (or ancients) in contradistinction to the moderns.  Political philosophy, from the time of Socrates and Plato, has always been regarded as the queen of the philosophical enterprises because it most pertains to the question of being human.  Hence, political philosophy is necessarily tied to … Continue reading The Great Divide: Political Philosophy, Ancient vs. Modern

Cicero: On Duties and Obligations

Cicero, perhaps the most famous of the Roman philosophers, wrote an influential treatise on duties and obligations published after his death.  De Officiis, along with his Republic/Commonwealth and Laws, is Cicero’s longstanding legacy to the West.  In fact, On Obligations was widely influential in that it influenced Sts. Augustine and Thomas Aquinas, becoming an integral … Continue reading Cicero: On Duties and Obligations

Cicero: Patriotism as Social Animus

Cicero is perhaps the most famous of the Roman Stoic philosophers.  We examined Seneca and Cato (the Youngers) in this post, and mentioned the role of Cicero in developing Roman Stoic thought.  Cicero wrote many philosophical works, the two most famous being On the Republic/Commonwealth and The Laws.  We will begin to look at Cicero’s … Continue reading Cicero: Patriotism as Social Animus