What is Original Sin?

Original Sin, in Christianity, is an affirmed doctrine that is oftentimes misconstrued by those who know little of church tradition and by those critics of Christianity who are equally illiterate and unread about Christianity.  Original Sin is a term that many who have grown up in a Christian culture will have heard of.  But what … Continue reading What is Original Sin?

Hegel: Dialectical Self-Consciousness (Lordship-Bondsman, sec. 178-196 Phenomenology of Spirit)

Apart from the preface, and other famous sections within the Phenomenology of Spirit, the most famous section of Hegel’s Phenomenology is his commentary of lordship and bondage in self-consciousness.  For Hegel, self-consciousness is in itself for itself.  However, the consummation of self-consciousness—that is, self-understanding—depends on the other.  Hegel’s ontology is necessarily dialectic insofar that it … Continue reading Hegel: Dialectical Self-Consciousness (Lordship-Bondsman, sec. 178-196 Phenomenology of Spirit)

Political Philosophy: What is Conservatism?

In beginning a series of explanatory overviews of various schools of political philosophy, I have started to decide with the most ancient of the schools of thought: Conservatism.  For English-speaking people, conservatism is a term that has infiltrated public consciousness but few seem to understand it.  In particular the two greatest groups of offenders of … Continue reading Political Philosophy: What is Conservatism?

Edmund Burke’s Critique of the French Revolution

Edmund Burke looms large in the history of political philosophy and the philosophy of critique for a divided legacy of either being the first modern conservative or a very moderate liberal.  Likewise, he offered up one of the first systematic critiques of the French Revolution which began the “Pamphlet Wars” in England which divided the … Continue reading Edmund Burke’s Critique of the French Revolution

Jean Paul Sartre: Bad Faith

The one theme from Sartre’s magnum opus, Being and Nothingness, that stuck was his commentary on “Bad Faith.”  Ignorant atheists who have never read Sartre have employed Sartrean language to refer to religious faith as the bad faith that Sartre is discussing even though it is not.  Furthermore, the concept of bad faith is included … Continue reading Jean Paul Sartre: Bad Faith

Simone de Beauvoir: The Woman Destroyed

The third story of Simone de Beauvoir’s The Woman Destroyed, aptly titled “The Woman Destroyed,” puts to poetic-diary story the essence of Beauvoir’s existential and Marxian feminism.  Through the course of the entries we learn that the narrator, Monique, is trapped madly in love with a bourgeois careerist man - “the serious man” - Maurice.  … Continue reading Simone de Beauvoir: The Woman Destroyed

Jean Paul Sartre: On Nothingness

Jean Paul Sartre was among the most famous of the modern existentialists and phenomenologists, perhaps second only to Martin Heidegger.  Sartre’s great text of fame was his “essay on ontology,” Being and Nothingness.  In typical French fashion, the text is weighty, dense, and draws heavily from the history of philosophy, especially Christianity, Bacon, Descartes, Hegel, … Continue reading Jean Paul Sartre: On Nothingness