Sartre: Vertigo (On the Fragility of Freedom)

One of the most famous sections in Sartre’s Being and Nothingness is his commentary over the moment of vertigo—dramatized with a person on the edge of cliffside looking down to his death below or his freedom above.  One of the easiest, and shortest, sections of his work, the “moment of vertigo” is really the realization … Continue reading Sartre: Vertigo (On the Fragility of Freedom)

Heidegger and the Crisis of Philosophy

Martin Heidegger rose to prominence with the publication of his magisterial ontological treatise Being and Time.  The work opens with a reflection on the nature of being, “Being is the most universal concept,” Heidegger declares, and that the question of being “has today been forgotten.”  Why did Heidegger write his seemingly incomprehensible work and to … Continue reading Heidegger and the Crisis of Philosophy

Jean Paul Sartre: Bad Faith

The one theme from Sartre’s magnum opus, Being and Nothingness, that stuck was his commentary on “Bad Faith.”  Ignorant atheists who have never read Sartre have employed Sartrean language to refer to religious faith as the bad faith that Sartre is discussing even though it is not.  Furthermore, the concept of bad faith is included … Continue reading Jean Paul Sartre: Bad Faith

Simone de Beauvoir: The Woman Destroyed

The third story of Simone de Beauvoir’s The Woman Destroyed, aptly titled “The Woman Destroyed,” puts to poetic-diary story the essence of Beauvoir’s existential and Marxian feminism.  Through the course of the entries we learn that the narrator, Monique, is trapped madly in love with a bourgeois careerist man - “the serious man” - Maurice.  … Continue reading Simone de Beauvoir: The Woman Destroyed

Existentialism, War, and Fascism

I have explored the actual intellectual currents and heritage of fascism in a series of posts here.  The fact is, most of the people whom are called “fascist” are not fascist.  The degradation of language is pernicious and indicative of the moral degeneracy of our current culture - though this is not a new phenomenon … Continue reading Existentialism, War, and Fascism

Simone de Beauvoir: The Second Sex

Simone de Beauvoir stands alongside Jean Paul Sartre and Albert Camus as the trinity of French existentialist writers that most people will encounter in their dealings with modern 20th century existentialism after Heidegger.  Influenced by philosophers like Augustine, Hegel, Marx, and Heidegger, the French existentialists took their intellectual forebears and turned them in new directions.  … Continue reading Simone de Beauvoir: The Second Sex

Hegel’s Phenomenology: Preface, II (24-37)

Sections 24-37 of Hegel’s Phenomenology contain the his system of science (knowledge) or philosophy.  Having laid out the groundworks of what he is dealing with, namely how do we avoid nihilism and come to actual knowing which is the embodiment of objective substance within the subjective self (a form of transcendental phenomenology), Hegel moves into … Continue reading Hegel’s Phenomenology: Preface, II (24-37)