Joseph De Maistre: The Metaphysics of the French Revolution

“Evil has nothing in common with life; it cannot create, since its power is purely negative.  Evil is the schism of being; it is not true.  Now what distinguishes the French Revolution and makes it an event unique in history is that it is radically bad.”  Those are the words of Franco-Savoyard lawyer and diplomat … Continue reading Joseph De Maistre: The Metaphysics of the French Revolution

Reading Ibn Khaldun’s Muqaddimah: Part II

Ibn Khaldun’s landmark work Muqaddimah really begins at Chapter II of Book I.  Here he begins his analysis of civilization, its character and nature, and the contrast between sedentary (urban) life over and against Bedouin (rural or nomadic) civilization.  Before we begin I must address a glaring elephant in the room by what Ibn Khaldun … Continue reading Reading Ibn Khaldun’s Muqaddimah: Part II

Dialectic and Wisdom in the Book of Job

“You’re not listening.”  This simple phrase is one of the most cliché, but poignantly true, sentences concerning human existence.  Just a Kohelet stated that there is time for everything under the sun, it is important, then, to know when the time is to speak and when the time is to listen.  This is especially true … Continue reading Dialectic and Wisdom in the Book of Job

Augustine on Creation and Evil

Although Confessions is long-winded prayer and an autobiography, Confessions is also a work of profound philosophical importance.  The first half of Confessions roughly deals with anthropology, the tension between desire and reason, and the need for reason to order desire to achieve what desire seeks.  The second half of Confessions shifts to a more neo-Platonic … Continue reading Augustine on Creation and Evil