Existentialism, War, and Fascism

I have explored the actual intellectual currents and heritage of fascism in a series of posts here.  The fact is, most of the people whom are called “fascist” are not fascist.  The degradation of language is pernicious and indicative of the moral degeneracy of our current culture - though this is not a new phenomenon … Continue reading Existentialism, War, and Fascism

The Specters of Fascism, Part VII

In concluding our series in examining fascism, its roots, its concrete manifestations, and its legacies, we have noted what is fascism and what is not fascism.  The common threads of fascist thought include: the synthesis of the people with the state for militaristic and warring ends (since conflict defines life through and through), that fascism’s … Continue reading The Specters of Fascism, Part VII

The Specters of Fascism, Part VI

Having explored the historical, and actual, roots of fascism, it is time to transition to the specters of fascism and understand why those groups often labelled “fascist” today – while certainly having some affinity and commonality with fascism, are not, actually, fascist.  In this post where will examine the “Alt-Right,” “Identitarianism,” and “Pan-Europeanism,” as three … Continue reading The Specters of Fascism, Part VI

Specters of Fascism, Part V

As we complete our tour and analysis of “historical fascism,” or what German scholar Ernst Nolte called “fascism in its epoch” (Der Faschismus in seiner Epoche, 1963), we turn to the more contentious historical movements that have sometimes been associated with fascism but scholars have generally regarded as not having been fascist (though certainly benefiting … Continue reading Specters of Fascism, Part V

Specters of Fascism, Part IV

Of all the fascist movements, German fascism (or “National Socialism”) is probably the most famous and least understood.  Fascism in Germany was the epicenter of the brief life of fascism, produced a number of intellectuals – serious and forgotten – from which we are able to derive a lineage of fascist philosophy.  While antecedent roots … Continue reading Specters of Fascism, Part IV

Specters of Fascism, Part III

To understand fascism, it was necessary to begin with the Romantic Movement, otherwise one will not have a solid familiarity with the ideas that fascism sought to emulate, restore, and implement, as well as distort.  In the history of fascism, especially in the 20th century, there are three key specters to examine: Italian fascism, German … Continue reading Specters of Fascism, Part III

Specters of Fascism, Part II

In-of-itself, Romanticism is not a fascist movement or philosophy.  But fascism drew upon the rich intellectual traditions of Romanticism, even if it distorted it some very important and meaningful ways.  So what is Romanticism? Philosophical Romanticism was a counterrevolutionary intellectual and artistic movement that arose in the late Enlightenment.  It was starkly opposed to Enlightenment … Continue reading Specters of Fascism, Part II